Writer

Sanjukta Paul

Sanjukta Paul’s current research and writing involves the intersection of antitrust law and labor policy, in particular how and why antitrust law has limited the coordination rights of working people. Her book project on this topic will be published as Solidarity in the Shadow of Antitrust by Cambridge University Press. She is generally interested in the intersections of work regulation and the law of business, and in how law constructs economic life. Her papers include “Uber as For-Profit Hiring Hall: A Price-Fixing Paradox and its Implications” (spring 2017), published in the Berkeley Journal of Employment & Labor Law, and “The Enduring Ambiguities of Antitrust Liability for Worker Collective Action” (spring 2016), which was recognized with the Jerry S. Cohen Memorial Fund’s award for the best antitrust scholarship of 2016 (category prize), presented by the American Antitrust Institute. She is also contributing a chapter on antitrust and workers to the forthcoming Reviving American Labor (C. Garden and R. Bales, eds., Cambridge University Press, forthcoming). Paul previously served as David J. Epstein Fellow in Public Interest Law & Policy at UCLA Law School. There she designed and taught the Workers Rights Litigation Clinic, which represented low-wage workers in wage theft claims, and in a complex class action alongside local non-profit organizations. Prior to this fellowship, Paul practiced as a public interest lawyer in Los Angeles for several years, focusing on employment and civil rights litigation, as well as some labor union matters. During this time she also worked on the campaign to reform the working conditions in the port trucking industry with the policy nonprofit Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy. Paul clerked for the Honorable Alfred T. Goodwin of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. She is a graduate of Yale Law School, where she was a Coker Fellow, and studied philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh, where she held a national Mellon Fellowship in Humanistic Studies and earned an M.A.
Law and the Future of Gig Work in California: Problems and Potentials (Part 1)

Law and the Future of Gig Work in California: Problems and Potentials (Part 1)

Last week, a coalition of 75 professors from across the country sent a letter to California lawmakers in support of AB5.  AB5, which will soon be voted on in the California Senate, codifies the legal standard articulated in Dynamex v. Superior Court (2018) and extends it to all California employment laws.  In Dynamex, the Court created a presumption of employee status and set forth a simplified legal standard (“ABC” test) for an entity attempting to classify workers as independent contractors.

Amicus Brief in Seattle Case: Antitrust and Worker Cooperation

Amicus Brief in Seattle Case: Antitrust and Worker Cooperation

s most readers of this blog know, the Ninth Circuit will soon be deciding Seattle’s authorization to implement its recently enacted ordinance, which permits collective bargaining among drivers in their bargains with Uber and similar firms. In March of last year, the Chamber of Commerce sued the city of Seattle, claiming (among other things) that Section 1 of the Sherman Act’s prohibition of “combination[s] … in restraint of trade or commerce” preempts the ordinance. More recently, the district court granted Seattle’s motion to dismiss, permitting the ordinance to go forward under the state action exemption, under which a state (and its political subdivisions, when authorized by the state) may regulate a domain in a way that “displaces competition.”