Tag

discrimination

Pay Equity in Massachusetts

Pay Equity in Massachusetts

Today we recognize Equal Pay Day, symbolizing how far into the current year the average woman has to work to earn as much as her male colleagues in the prior year. Thanks to persistent gender wage gaps and gender discrimination, women in Massachusetts still only make about 84 cents for every dollar made by men.

California Bans the Box, Twice: Bright-Line Limits on Justifying Criminal Record Screens (Part I)

California Bans the Box, Twice: Bright-Line Limits on Justifying Criminal Record Screens (Part I)

On January 1, California’s new “Ban the Box” law took effect. Although California is known for its progressive labor policies, it also has a dismal history of racialized mass incarceration, making this development especially important. The new law fits squarely...

Analyzing James Damore’s Employment-Related Claims against Google—Part Two

Analyzing James Damore’s Employment-Related Claims against Google—Part Two

After Google terminated James Damore for his now infamous memo, he claimed that he was fired for concerted activities protected under the National Labor Relations Act (discussed in Part One) as well as for pointing out “potentially illegal policies/behavior.”  This post examines whether Damore might have a claim under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 for retaliation for opposing his employer’s (allegedly) discriminatory HR policies.  (As noted in the first post, this analysis is inevitably premature, as further facts may come to light that could dramatically change these claims.)

Analyzing James Damore’s Employment-Related Claims against Google: Part One

Analyzing James Damore’s Employment-Related Claims against Google: Part One

When James Damore wrote his internal memo against Google’s diversity policies, was he making an impassioned plea on behalf of politically and ideologically charged ideas?  Calling on his fellow workers to fight for changes to company diversity policies?  Taking a stand against HR practices that illegally discriminate against protected classes of employees?  Was his manifesto all, some, or none of these things?